DONORS:
Douglas and Pamela Bryan, Patricia and Fred Dahl, Malida Klimes, Dennis
and Rosalina Grisco, Maria Grisco, Ryan Grisco, Christina Grisco, James
and Beverly Fenske, Randy and Yolanda Grisco, Russell and Billie Lynes,
Danny and Gail Linde, Tom and Gigi Linde, Matt Linde
Bill Linde was
a dynamic man who was a
falconer, musician, rebel,
hunter, horseman, and car
enthusiast, but above all else,
he was a cowboy. Within
him was the constant drive
for adventure and the desire
to become a part of the land
and animals he so dearly
loved. It was this need that
led him through lifes course
and molded him into the
man he was. He sought out
his dreams and wherever
he walked, he created and
shared exciting experiences
with those around him. He had a way with people that made them
want to become close and be part of what he was doing. Many became
lifelong friends. Whatever Bill was involved in, he did it with devotion,
perseverance, and love. Falconry was one of those experiences.
Bill was the second of four brothers. He, and his youngest brother,
Danny, were very close, and often pursued the same interests including
cars, horses, motorcycles, and falconry. In 1952, Bill started the
Kingsmen Car Club with his brother David and all four brothers were
together during this time. In 1996 the Kingsmen Car Club was re-
established by Bill’s grandson, Nathan, with input from Bill who was also
a member. He enjoyed having long conversations about cars with his
son Matthew to exchange ideas and technical know how.
Bill loved animals and constantly had a dog by his side that, of course,
was trained by him. Bill wore cowboy boots (he might have slept in
them), western belt buckles, and cowboy hats. He was definitely an
original. He owned and rode horses his entire life and started the Pony
Express in Dragoon Arizona in the later years. He was always a leader
of men and always a cowboy. He gifted his children with the knack for
adventure and exploration by raising them in remote areas of Arizona
and Idaho. They fished, hunted for Indian artifacts, and learned about
the wilderness and falconry.
Falconry became a part of Bill’s life in 1957, at the
age of 20, when he was introduced to the Southern
California Falconer’s Association (SCFA). Bill
committed himself to the art of falconry and the
friends that flew with him. In order to obtain
a bird, he would brave treacherous cliffs with
nothing but a rope, and climb 150 foot ponderosa
pines with only a bag to carry the chick. Over the
years, he raised, trained, and hunted with a variety
of birds.
One of his favorites was Socony, a mature, female Red Tail Hawk the
Fish and Game Department donated to the SCFA. She became Bill’s
personal hunting bird. She had many flights until Bill properly de-
manned her and released her back into the wild. His ethical actions and
knowledge gained the respect of his fellow falconers, and he was voted
in to the SCFA as president of the club. This led to an ever, evolving
discipline, which included procuring tools of the trade by making them
from scratch such as breeding equipment, mews, perches, hoods, jesses,
swivels, snaps, or bells. Bill assisted in developing the ball bearing swivels
used in the block perches that his friend, Don Grisco, so expertly made.
He was ceaselessly offering a hand, and no project was too big or too
small.
The pursuit of perfection, with the immense respect for these raptors
set Bill apart from most involved. As his life long friend, Roger Claude,
stated, “Bill was always proficient in his practices, and the preservation
of these winged champions was on the forefront. Roger attested to Bill
as being “a friend of everyone he met.
Bill was active in his passion for falconry until 1967, and during these 10
years, he flew birds in California and Arizona. His two oldest children
experienced those years with him as well as his first wife of 25 years,
Mary Anne. He mentioned several times in his notes an appreciation
for Mary Anne for being patient and helpful while he flew. Bill always
loved falconry and stayed close to his friends, even though his life took a
different direction. He worked hard to provide for his family and was a
successful salesman in the paper industry. His love of falconry was never
forgotten and always a part of who he was.
Later in life, amazingly, at the age of 63, Bill met a wild Coopers Hawk
outside his house in Dragoon. The hawk would wait and watch so Bill
decided to train the adult bird without jesses using the knowledge he
gained from Roger Claude. After time, the hawk would fly in each day at
the same time to eat off of the tip of Bill’s boot, and land on his fist. The
entire training process was documented in a journal.
Bill was a unique man who dared to turn his dreams into reality, who
stood by his friends, and who was passionate about what he believed in.
He definitely will be missed. Those who engaged, and embraced his
company were very lucky to have known him.
He loved us all so very much.
Written by Billie Linde Lynes and Tom Linde
Whatever Bill was involved in, he did it with devotion,
perseverance, and love.
Falconry was one of those experiences.
Bill was a unique man who
dared to turn his dreams
into reality, who stood by
his friends, and who was
passionate about what he
believed in.
He definitely will be missed.
Bill with his brother Danny
at a SCFA meeting, 1961.
Bill and his first wife of 25
years, Mary Anne, 1957.
Bill and Mary Anne with
Socony, a red tailed Hawk.
Bill with sons, Tom and Matt,
and brother Danny, 2013
Bill and his daugther
Billieann in 2010.
Bill and his great grand
daugher Alabama, 2007.
Bill and his wife Donna
at their wedding, 2011.
Bill and Russ enjoying
a ride.